• WAR & PEACE
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04.17.14

Walking many a mile along the Nile

A former captain in the British army is walking through South Sudan's civil war as he follows the Nile River from Rwanda to Egypt.

  • SCIENCE
04.17.14

Scientists worry over disappearing monarch butterfly

There are many possible reasons for the monarch's decline, scientists say. But they’re focusing now on one major one: Monarch butterflies can't survive without the milkweed.

  • WAR & PEACE
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04.16.14

Waiting for the barrel bombs to drop

In Syria's Aleppo, the sound of a helicopter's whirring blades usually means that barrel bombs, oil drums filled with TNT that can level buildings, will fall.

  • LAW
04.16.14

Black reporter honored by group that barred him

Harry McAlpin was the first black reporter to attend a presidential press conference. He was not welcomed by many of the journalists at the White House.

  • KIDS
04.16.14

Efforts to stop school violence hurt by lack of money

Mental-health professionals in Pennsylvania schools, for instance, say funding cuts in recent years have prompted reductions in school counselors, social workers and psychologists.

  • LAW
04.15.14

Obama says religious hatred has no place in the U.S.

Three people were killed in an apparent hate crime on Sunday. The shootings happened at two Jewish community centers in the Kansas City area.

  • SCIENCE
04.15.14

Some clever chimps stage escape at Kansas City Zoo

It took a branch, a wall, and a smart chimpanzee ringleader to cause a "Code Red" at the zoo.

  • KIDS
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04.15.14

Little users become the next big thing for tablets

In the U.S., the percentage of kids ages 8 and under using mobile devices has doubled in the past two years. And they're spending more time on the tablets too.

  • LAW
04.14.14

Chicago neighborhoods vie for Obama library for economic shot in the arm

At least five community groups, universities or developers from around Chicago are preparing bids for the library. Obama's decision will be announced early next year.

  • KIDS
04.14.14

Fleeing Fukushima: Attending school far away

The 2011 tsunami disaster destroyed the Fukushima nuclear plant. Because radiation is still leaking, a town 200 miles away has offered to take in students.

  • KIDS
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04.14.14

Schools look for ways to stop students from tossing their lunches

Nationally, the cost of wasted food in schools — including milk, meats and grains — is estimated at more than $1 billion a year.

  • KIDS
04.11.14

Lupita's look, a short Afro, becomes a standard of beauty

Academy Award winning actress Lupita Nyong'o wears her hair in an extra-short Afro style. She's helped broaden what is considered to be beautiful hair.

  • MONEY
04.11.14

Pilot saves dogs by flying them all over the U.S.

Arizona is full of Chihuahuas, but they may be adopted should they be sent to Pennsylvania. Peter Rork uses his plane to fly dogs to places where they're more likely to be adopted.

  • WAR & PEACE
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04.11.14

Twenty years after violence tore it apart, Rwanda prospers

“We must work hard because if we wait for others to develop our country, we will not make progress,” says Rwanda's president.

  • MONEY
04.10.14

Fast-food workers accuse some employers of wage theft

While pressing for an increase in the minimum wage and to join a union, the workers at some demonstrations have carried signs saying "wage theft."

  • SCIENCE
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04.10.14

NASA grapples with morality in space

There has always been risk with spaceflight. But as missions get longer, just how much risk can it ask of its astronauts? NASA asked the Institute of Medicine for some advice.

  • SCIENCE
04.10.14

California's drought is changing the landscaping

A growing number of cities are paying homeowners to tear out their grass lawns and replace them with low-water plants more suited to the state's dry summers and mild winters.

  • SCIENCE
04.09.14

Explaining broader connections and the big picture

James Gates is a passionate teacher and well-known physicist. He has colorful opinions about science teaching and the need for diversity of thought.

  • KIDS
04.09.14

Once unhip instrument is now cool, accordion to Weird Al

The accordion, with its unique sound, is making a big comeback. Part of it has to do with the trend of rediscovering weird things and making them cool.

  • MONEY
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04.09.14

China ventures overseas for farmland

China has 20 percent of the world's population, but just 9 percent of its usable agricultural land. The country is buying foreign farmland, or leasing it, or forming partnerships with companies.

  • HEALTH
04.08.14

Study's 5-second rule results disputed

The less time food is on the floor before it's picked up, the fewer bacteria get transferred, the study says. But, said one expert, "I think one second is too long."

  • SCIENCE
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04.08.14

Tiny microbes of death nearly wiped out life on Earth, study suggests

Called the Great Dying, a mass extinction occurred at the end of the Permian Period of the Paleozoic Era. The study named a new suspect, a microbe known as Methanosarcina.

  • ARTS
04.08.14

Recording without sound, capturing all the music notes

A Disklavier piano records the notes digitally then, through the Internet, sends them to another Disklavier which replays the music. It can change the way music is taught.

  • LAW
04.07.14

Much ado about what to do with the nation's feral cats

A fierce battle is raging between cat lovers and bird lovers over how to handle the millions of feral cats living on the streets.

  • MONEY
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04.07.14

Satellites beam "Dr. Who" to movie theaters, and show the future

The 50th anniversary episode of the British TV show came to movie theaters in the U.S. and Latin America. And so did the fans. Theaters now see themselves showing more than movies.

  • KIDS
04.07.14

More children and teens crossing into U.S. unaccompanied

Fear of gang violence and hopes that the U.S. will change its immigration laws have driven more youths to make the risky journey across the U.S.-Mexico border.