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SPORTS
 

Two Syrian sisters take a dangerous swim, to a safe swim

Ysra Mardini (left) and her sister, Sarah, both from Syria, pose for a photo during a training session in Berlin, Germany, Nov. 9, 2015.
Ysra Mardini (left) and her sister, Sarah, both from Syria, pose for a photo during a training session in Berlin, Germany, Nov. 9, 2015. AP/Michael Sohn

BERLIN, Germany — Sarah and Ysra Mardini are at a pool built for the 1936 Olympics held in Berlin, Germany. They pull bathing caps over their long, black hair and slide into the water, disappearing among the throng of swimmers with powerful, practiced strokes.

Two months ago the sisters were swimming for their lives, after jumping off an inflatable boat that was carrying Syrian refugees to Greece. The boat had begun taking on water. Now they are swimming the length of a pool that has become a home away from home for the two young women, who were once among Syria's brightest swimming stars.

"Everything was good," said 20-year-old Sarah. "That was before the war."

After the civil war began in Syria, the Mardini family moved around the country to avoid the fighting and tried to ensure that their daughters could keep on swimming. Ysra, now 17, even represented Syria at the short-course world championships in Turkey in 2012. But as the war got worse they saw their fellow swimmers drift away.

Escaping By Sea ...

"We were 40 or 50 swimmers, and now we are maybe 10 or seven swimmers in Syria," said Sarah. "We want to have a future. I want to be in college, I want to be an international swimmer and my sister, too. But if we stay there we will not reach that because the situation is not OK in Syria."

The Mardini sisters eventually left the Syrian capital of Damascus in early August, joining a fresh wave of Syrians who had given up hope of seeing the conflict end soon. The sisters traveled to Lebanon, then Turkey, where they paid smugglers to take them to Greece.

The Turkish Coast Guard drove their boat back on the first attempt. The second time they boarded a small inflatable dinghy at dusk. Within a half hour it was taking on water, hopelessly overloaded with people, most of whom couldn't swim.

As evening winds churned up the Aegean Sea, all bags were thrown overboard to give the small boat a chance to stay afloat. When that wasn't enough, Ysra, Sarah and three others who were also strong swimmers jumped into the water in order to lighten the boat.

"I was not afraid of dying, because if anything happened I could swim to arrive at the island. But the problem was that I had 20 persons with me," said Sarah. "In Syria I worked in a swimming pool to watch people not drown, so if I let anyone drown or die I would not forgive myself."

For three hours they clung onto ropes hanging from the side until it reached shore on the Greek island of Lesbos.

... Then By Land

In the weekslong overland trek that followed, strangers gave them clothes. Others stole from them. Friends were arrested at borders and expensive tickets proved worthless, as authorities refused to let trains full of refugees cross borders.

Eventually, the sisters made it to Austria and then Germany. Shortly after arriving in Berlin, a local charity put them in touch with the Wasserfreunde Spandau 04, a swimming club based near their refugee shelter.

The club has embraced its newest members, putting them straight into a daily training routine.

Sven Spannekrebs, their coach, says the sisters are making amazing progress, though he is cautious about their prospects as athletes. "They can swim at the highest level for the Arab world, but there's a difference to Europe because of the training conditions," he said.

Ysra, who specializes in the butterfly stroke, is aiming high. "Maybe when I learn German I will start school. I want to be a pilot," she said. "And with my swimming I want to reach the Olympics."

Her older sister, meanwhile, is battling government rules to bring the rest of the family to Germany. In the pool, she prefers long-distance swimming.

"It seems to me that I have balanced my life," said Sarah. "We can't do anything good in our life if we don't have swimming."

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1
Anchor 1: What the Text Says

All four sentences below help make the claim that the Mardini sisters are good swimmers.

Which of them gives the STRONGEST piece of evidence to support the claim?

A

They pull bathing caps over their long, black hair and slide into the water, disappearing among the throng of swimmers with powerful, practiced strokes.

B

"In Syria I worked in a swimming pool to watch people not drown, so if I let anyone drown or die I would not forgive myself."

C

Shortly after arriving in Berlin, a local charity put them in touch with the Wasserfreunde Spandau 04, a swimming club based near their refugee shelter.

D

"They can swim at the highest level for the Arab world, but there's a difference to Europe because of the training conditions," he said.

2
Anchor 2: Central Idea

Which two of the following sentences from the article include central ideas of the article?

  1. Two months ago the sisters were swimming for their lives, after jumping off an inflatable boat that was carrying Syrian refugees to Greece.

  2. As evening winds churned up the Aegean Sea, all bags were thrown overboard to give the small boat a chance to stay afloat.

  3. Now they are swimming the length of a pool that has become a home away from home for the two young women, who were once among Syria's brightest swimming stars.

  4. Friends were arrested at borders and expensive tickets proved worthless, as authorities refused to let trains full of refugees cross borders.

A

1 and 2

B

1 and 3

C

2 and 3

D

3 and 4

3
Anchor 1: What the Text Says

Select the paragraph from the section "...Then By Land" that shows that some people are taking advantage of the refugees.

4
Anchor 2: Central Idea

Which of the following sentences is MOST important to include in an objective summary of the article?

A

The number of swimmers in Syria has gone from 40 or 50 to 10 or 7.

B

The sisters' new coach says that they are good swimmers, but not as good as the Europeans.

C

The sisters left Syria so that they could continue to swim.

D

Now that the sisters are in Germany, they have a lot of plans for the future.

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