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KIDS
 

For many high school students, exhaustion is a part of life

Michelle Pindrik, a junior, rubs her face to stay awake during teacher Rich Schram's eighth period honors physics class, Aug. 28, 2014, at Buffalo Grove High School in Buffalo Grove, Illinois. The American Academy of Pediantrics says school start times should be pushed to 8:30 a.m. or later, as many students aren't getting enough sleep.
Michelle Pindrik, a junior, rubs her face to stay awake during teacher Rich Schram's eighth period honors physics class, Aug. 28, 2014, at Buffalo Grove High School in Buffalo Grove, Illinois. The American Academy of Pediantrics says school start times should be pushed to 8:30 a.m. or later, as many students aren't getting enough sleep. Brian Cassella/Chicago Tribune/MCT

CHICAGO — Many high school students don’t get enough sleep. They often stay up late doing homework and get up early for school.

Few students get the 8 to 10 hours of sleep a night they need to grow and learn. For these students, being exhausted is just a part of life.

Last week, a group of doctors recommended that schools start later so young people can get more sleep. The group of pediatricians, doctors who treat children, advised schools to start at 8:30 a.m. or later.

Today, more than 8 out of 10 schools start earlier than that. Most Chicago-area high schools start at 8 a.m. Many student athletes have early practices at 6 a.m.

"Not The Healthiest Way"

Students not getting enough sleep is a serious issue. It’s more than just being tired. Judith Owens, a sleep expert at a children’s hospital, called it a “public health crisis.”

Sleep is essential for the mental and emotional health of young people. Losing sleep puts young people at risk for serious diseases such as heart disease and diabetes as they get older.

Owens said starting school later is a simple and effective way to make sure young people are getting enough sleep.

High school senior Nicole Bankowski usually only sleeps five hours on weeknights. She takes difficult AP classes, edits her school newspaper and sings in the choir. She often doesn’t start doing her homework until 10:30 p.m.

Bankowski burns the candle at both ends — she stays up late and wakes up early. Sometimes she doesn’t get to bed until 3 a.m.

“It’s probably not the healthiest way to live, but it’s the only way to get everything done,” Bankowski said.

Busy Days And Nights

This month, Bankowski will start applying to colleges. She expects to get even busier, but she has no choice.

Bankowski said she has to think about her future. “It’s more important than going out or taking a nap.”

Matt Shapiro is another student who doesn’t get enough sleep. He’s president of the student council and captain of his school’s speech and debate team. He gets up at 6 every morning.

No matter how tired he feels at school, Shapiro tries hard to stay awake in class.

Shapiro once fell asleep in class, in third grade. “I never forgot how badly I felt,” Shapiro said. “I never let it happen again.”

Schools Stick With Early Starts

School leaders say starting classes later is not so simple. Starting classes later means ending classes later. That can interfere with after-school sports and other activities.

“I can’t change when the sun sets,” one district superintendent said. “Even band practice would be affected.”

Another district is studying how to manage students’ time so the young people can learn best and be healthy.

For now, most Chicago-area schools seem to be sticking with early start times. The idea to start school later has been around for a long time, but schools haven’t signed up.

Young people face many difficulties when they reach high school. Their changing bodies make it harder to get to bed early. Their minds are developing quickly and school is becoming more serious.

It’s a “perfect storm,” according to Owens — many small problems combining into a bigger one.

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1
Anchor 1: What the Text Says

According to the article, which of the following sentences is NOT CORRECT?

A

Sleeping less during the night gives rise to a range of health problems among teens.

B

Teenagers require at least 8 hours of sleep for their proper mental and emotional health.

C

Getting to bed late at night and waking up early is a necessity for most high school students.

D

Despite insufficient sleep, many students easily cope with a busy schedule at school.

2
Anchor 1: What the Text Says

According to the article, school districts do not want to start school late, even though the idea has been discussed many times.

Select the sentence from the article that BEST supports the above statement.

A

That can interfere with after-school sports and other activities.

B

"I can't change when the sun sets," one district superintendent said.

C

Another district is studying how to manage students' time so the young people can learn best and be healthy.

D

Young people face many difficulties when they reach high school.

3
Anchor 4: Word Meaning & Choice

In which of the sentences given below does the word "sticking" have the SAME meaning as it is used in this sentence?

For now, most Chicago-area schools seem to be sticking with early start times.

A

One should avoid sticking to bad habits.

B

I appreciate you for sticking up for me.

C

The old man has a white hair sticking out of his head.

D

Stop the leakage by sticking a tape on the container.

4
Anchor 4: Word Meaning & Choice

Read the following sentence from paragraph 2 of the section "Not The Healthiest Way."

Sleep is essential for the mental and emotional health of young people.

In the context of the article, which of these words BEST replaces the word "essential" in the given sentence without changing its meaning?

A

basic

B

crucial

C

significant

D

urgent

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